School funding is important for student success. We care about how much schools receive and how they use their resources.

For example, students should have access to strong educators. They should have the chance to enroll in advanced courses. And they should have modern textbooks and technology.

The students with the greatest needs should have the most resources. But we know their schools often don’t receive the resources they need.

Who decides the budget?

The school district’s leadership develops the budget plan. The School Board is responsible for voting to approve the budget.

When does this happen?

A school district’s budget is usually finalized by Spring. But the real work is already happening. You can find out more at School Board meetings and at public hearings.

Click here to check out how your school is funded. Then, here are a few questions you can ask district leaders and other elected officials:

HOW IS THE DISTRICT INVESTING TO MEET THE NEEDS OF OUR SCHOOL?

What services are provided to students learning English in our school? To students with disabilities?

Are low-income students getting extra support to achieve at high levels?

In middle and high schools, do our students have access to advanced courses?

THE DISTRICT IS GOING TO GET MORE MONEY FROM THE STATE THIS YEAR. ARE THEY PLANNING TO INVEST THESE NEW FUNDS IN A FAIR WAY?

All schools have needs, but a school district should put the most new resources into the schools that serve students with the greatest needs. Is the district planning to do that in this year’s budget? How?

Tip: Most school districts spend about the same in the schools that serve the most low-income students compared to the schools that serve the fewest low-income students. Equal is not the same as equitable!

DOES MY CHILD HAVE ACCESS TO STRONG EDUCATORS?

Tip: In many school districts, the highest-need schools have more new teachers than other schools. Research shows that having strong teachers is the most important in-school factor for student success. And teachers are typically stronger after a few years of experience. Click here to see how teacher experience at your child’s school compares to other schools.

 

Make your voice heard

Find your school district and send a letter to the Superintendent and School Board asking them to consider these three key equity questions when developing this year’s budget.

results in Adirondack Central School District and English.

How else can I have my voice heard?

You can help ensure your child’s school is getting the funding it needs.

See how much funding your child’s school is receiving and how it’s being spent.

Click here to see how much money is budgeted for your child’s school. You can also see how it compares to other schools in the district.

Work with other equity-focused parents.

There is strength in numbers. Elected officials are more likely to pay attention to an issue when they hear from many people. Talk to other parents about the budget issues that affect your school, and advocate together.

Make your voice heard.

Many public officials are eager to hear from their constituents. As a parent and city resident, you have an important point of view. Reach out to the district leaders, your School Board members, and elected officials with questions and to tell them what you think.