Press Release

New data tool allows users to find information on program diversity, in-state public school employment rates, and supply and demand patterns within regions

NEW YORK – The Education Trust–New York today launched the Educator Equity Snapshot online data tool, allowing users for the first time to explore data that raises important questions about how school districts and higher education institutions are communicating their needs and priorities to each other and to future educators.

Throughout more than two years of interviewing classroom teachers and analyzing previously unpublished data, Ed Trust–NY saw a common opportunity highlighted: improving transparency at each step of the teacher preparation pipeline — and intentionally using that data to strengthen teacher preparation — can advance educational equity.

“We believe that transparent and actionable data can play a critical role in supporting strong and diverse teaching candidates who are well-prepared to succeed in the classroom,” said Francisco M. Araiza, associate director of research and policy for Ed Trust–NY. “Ensuring access to strong educators is essential to improving equity in New York’s public schools and requires the combined work of teacher preparation programs, school districts, and state leaders.”

The online tool and accompanying report The First Frontier of Equity is intended to spotlight the importance of greater data transparency, availability, and usefulness by posing five critical questions:

  • Is New York State preparing a diverse future educator workforce?
  • Are program completers employed in New York State public schools after graduation?
  • Do program completers remain in New York State public schools?
  • Where do program completers teach in New York State public schools?
  • How well do program participants succeed in the classroom?

An Ed Trust–NY analysis of the data included in the tool revealed significant findings related to each of these questions:

  • In 2015-16, approximately 1 in 4 of all Bachelor’s and Master’s program completers were American Indian, Asian, Black, Latinx, or Multiracial. By comparison, more than half of students in New York’s public schools are students of color. More than half of program completers of color were enrolled in just nine Bachelor’s programs and seven Master’s programs.
  • Overall, 38% of Bachelor’s program completers and 58% of Master’s program completers who graduated in 2015 were employed as teachers in New York State public schools in 2016-17. Other program completers may be teaching out-of-state, in private schools, in community-based early childhood providers, or in other settings, as well.
  • The rates of in-state public school employment for both Bachelor’s and Master’s program completers varied widely based on certification area. For Bachelor’s program completers, the in-state public school employment rate ranged from 27% employment for early childhood program completers and 35% employment for elementary program completers to more than 50% employment for ESOL/bilingual educators, middle/secondary math, middle/secondary special education, and middle/secondary science. For Master’s program completers, the in-state public school employment rate ranged from 27% employment for early childhood program completers and 49% employment for elementary program completers to more than 75% employment for middle/secondary special education and ESOL/bilingual educators.
  • Teacher preparation programs primarily serve school districts in the region where they are located. Fifty-five percent of 2012-2015 Bachelor’s program completers who took teaching jobs in New York State public schools were employed in the same region as their teacher preparation program. Seventy-five percent of 2012-2015 Master’s program completers who took teaching jobs in New York State public schools were employed in the same region as their teacher preparation program.

“Data can be a resource for prospective teachers choosing an institution or certification area,” Araiza said. “It can also be a tool for teacher preparation programs that seek to align their programs with the needs of the state’s diverse learners in public school classrooms and for state policymakers who are ultimately responsible for making sure that the students with the greatest needs have access to the strongest educators. We encourage state leaders to make data about the state’s teacher preparation programs readily available and easily accessible to the public.”

For more data, including Equity Snapshots for individual teacher preparation programs, sectors, and regions, please visit www.edtrustny.org/Snapshots.