What We Do

Relentless advocates of educational justice for students across New York State – particularly those of color or living in poverty.

Equity-Driven Data-Centered Student-Focused

All students need access to a high-quality, rigorous education to prepare for the opportunities and demands of the world beyond school. But too many young people — disproportionately African American, Latino, and Native students and students from low-income families — are getting an education that falls far short.

Disrupting these inequitable patterns and raising achievement for all students will require major interventions in early childhood education, K-12 public schools, and higher education.

Working with our partners and grounded in The Education Trust’s deep commitment to honest data, The Education TrustNew York will help to establish a collaboratively defined agenda that focuses policymakers and the public on equity, opportunity, and performance gaps, and solutions to tackle them.

EdTrustNY and our partners will seek to answer the following challenging questions in four priority policy areas:

PRIORITY: High-quality early care and education for all children

  • How can New York accelerate the pace of significantly expanded access to pre-kindergarten while ensuring quality, high standards, and transparency?
  • How can policy decisions and resource allocations support a strategy for early childhood care and learning that begin with birth — not pre‑K?

PRIORITY: Equitable implementation of high standards for college and career readiness

  • How can New York State achieve the equitable and sustainable implementation of rigorous academic standards that provide the framework to prepare all students for college and careers?
  • With the enactment of the federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), how can the state establish a strong accountability system that creates a pathway for long-term achievement gains?
  • Based on early reports suggesting that certain personalized learning models can accelerate student achievement and engagement, how can New York create, support, and promote an environment for personalized learning to succeed?
  • Recognizing that one-size-fits-all approaches do not enable all students to find their learning passions and connect to higher education and the workforce, how can the state develop rigorous pathways for students to meet high standards?

PRIORITY: Opportunities for all students to learn and succeed

  • Given the paramount importance of teacher effectiveness to student learning, what strategies will enable the state to maximize access to excellent teachers and school and district leaders, especially by low-income students and students of color?
  • How can the state arrive at a funding system that achieves the goal of providing adequate and equitable resources for all schools — particularly those that serve low-income students and students of color — and ensures that funds are wisely invested to produce high student achievement?
  • What strategies can New York adopt to foster empathy in our education system and recognize that social and emotional learning advances students’ lifelong success?
  • How can New York State reform disciplinary policies and practices and enact redemption strategies that enable young people who have dropped out and/or entered the criminal justice system to re-engage with education, thereby ending the school-to-prison pipeline?

PRIORITY: College completion and success in the workforce

  • In what ways can the state promote college access and ensure affordability — helping students avoid crushing levels of student loan debt — especially for low-income students, students of color, and first-generation and non-traditional college students?
  • How can state leaders prioritize student completion as an essential third pillar alongside access and affordability?
  • How can New York learn from and institutionalize promising practices, encourage innovation, and promote the necessary resources and incentives to make key reforms a reality at scale?